...how to reliably eliminate reflections when copying paintings.
Photographing paintings with highly glazed or reflective surfaces often gives rise to distracting reflections. While the human eye tends to accommodate this, when viewing a very textured and reflective oil painting, for example, it can become quite intrusive when viewing a reproduction on a material which one would expect to be matt, such as a Giclee print, or when viewing the image on a monitor screen.
Using a careful technique employing polarising filtration material over all light sources and an additional polarising filter over the camera lens, virtually all random reflections can be removed from the final reproduction, rendering the work clearer and more easily readable.

Please take a look at the comparisons below to see the technique in action.

We can tune this process at time of shooting to create a pleasing reproduction of your subject, with full or even incremental corrections and adjustments to suit the work. 
This heavily textured, varnished oil painting throws up a lot of reflections when lit in the usual way (left). Using the cross polarisation lighting technique, these distracting reflections can in most cases be totally eliminated (right).
This heavily textured, varnished oil painting throws up a lot of reflections when lit in the usual way (left). Using the cross polarisation lighting technique, these distracting reflections can in most cases be totally eliminated (right).
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